Best Practices

SoMNSourceLink: What is one key Thing Successful People Have in Common?

Published Dec 10, 2013 by

Bernard Marr, Best-Selling Author and Enterprise Performance Expert, gives thoughtful insights about what successful people don’t do: give up.

Do you get up in the morning, exhausted, confused, wondering if the path you’re on is really the right one for you?  Have faith.  So did Bill Gates, Henry Ford, Oprah Winfrey, J.K. Rowling and Walt Disney.  Often thought of as wildly successful, just like the rest of us, these people struggled and failed during the courses of their careers.  One thing they had in common? 

In his LinkedIn post, Bernard Marr Best-Selling Author and Enterprise Performance Expert, gives thoughtful insights about what these and other successful people didn’t and don’t do: give up. 

Marr states, “Success comes in all shapes and colours. You can be successful in your job and career but you can equally be successful in your marriage, at sports or a hobby. Whatever success you are after there is one thing all radically successful people have in common: Their ferocious drive and hunger for success makes them never give up.  In fact, some of the most successful people in business, entertainment and sports have failed. Many have failed numerous times but they have never given up. Successful people are able to pick themselves up, dust themselves off and carry on trying.”

Marr tells the story that Henry Ford started his company three times, getting fired by his investors the first two times, before forging out his dream.  Walt Disney was fired from a job, started a company called Laugh-O-Gram in Kansas, which failed, before moving to Hollywood to launch his empire. 

J.K Rowling, Harry Potter series author, “suffered many rejections of her manuscript for reasons like 'it was far too long for a children's book' or because 'children books never make any money'. J.K. Rowling's story is even more inspiring because when she started she was a divorced single mum on welfare,” states Marr.

Have some “Yes, But…” comments about Marr’s examples?  Read on:  so do the commenters whose posts follow Marr’s LinkedIn article.  Key points made in those comments include: follow your passion, and realize that the dream can be played out in many life situations; recognize when to call it quits and cut your losses; plan your venture thoughtfully before embarking (balance head and heart).  Or another view, as commenter poignantly stated: “Let's hear about the family losing a home to foreclosure and enduring an unimaginable stretch of self-reliance. Let's hear about the single mom or dad whose measure of success is providing the basics for their family, putting a child through school, or taking the time to read a bedtime story to their son or daughter. This type of story points out the one-in-a-million success to which many aspire. I believe it is time to start celebrating the everyday successful person.”

In all cases above, the idea of forging on, believing in yourself, and persevering, underscores the message of “don’t give up.” 

Content contributed by Maria Brown, SoMNSourceLink.SoMNSourceLink is a proud affiliate of U.S.SourceLink, America’s largest resource network for entrepreneurs.